New York, NY, May 13, 2015 – A commitment to excellence during the past year has earned Man Made Music (MMM) the recognition as a 2015 AT&T Supplier Award winner for its support of affiliates of AT&T*, one of the world’s leading service providers of advanced mobile services, next-generation TV, high-speed Internet and smart solutions for businesses.

“AT&T continues to give our customers the best products and services, with the help of our more than 5,000 suppliers.” said Susan A. Johnson, senior vice president, Global Supply Chain at AT&T. “Companies such as Man Made Music are committed to delighting customers, just like we are.”

Man Made Music was one of eight companies to receive the 2015 AT&T Supplier Award, honored for their work in cost savings, customer service, performance, team work, diversity supplier spend and supplier sustainability. And on April 30, AT&T recognized the winners’ contributions in an ad in the Wall Street Journal.

*AT&T products and services are provided or offered by subsidiaries and affiliates of AT&T Inc. under the AT&T brand and not by AT&T Inc.

It’s hard to put into words the impact of the perfect lyric, melody or contagious beat that moves you in an unexpected way. Authors, composers and artists have tried – and here we’ve rounded up our favorite quotes that help to begin forming structure around such an unspoken universal force. Which are most meaningful to you? If you had to sum up the power of music and sound in one sentence, what would you say?

1. “Where words fail, music speaks.” – Hans Christian Andersen

2. “Music begins where the possibilities of language end.” – Jean Sibelius

3. “Half of the storytelling ability is sound.” – Joe Herrington, Principal Media Designer for Disney parks in the Imagineering department

4. “It’s hard to put into words the impact of the perfect lyric, melody or contagious beat that moves you in an unexpected way. Authors, composers and artists have tried – and here we’ve rounded up our favorite quotes that help to begin forming structure around such an unspoken universal force. Which are most meaningful to you? If you had to sum up the power of music and sound in one sentence, what would you say?”A painter paints pictures on canvas. But musicians paint their pictures on silence.” – Leopold Stokowski

5. “Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent” – Victor Hugo

6. “Get rid of the shitty sound. Life’s too short.” – Hans Zimmer

7. “Music . . .  can name the unnameable and communicate the unknowable.” – Leonard Bernstein

8. “When the whole world is silent, even one voice becomes powerful.” – Malala Yousafzai

9. “Music is the social act of communication among people, a gesture of friendship, the strongest there is.” – Malcom Arnold

10. “Music is organized sound.” – Edgard Varese

11. “Funny how a melody sounds like a memory.” – Eric Church

12. “If you talk to any director, they’ll say music is fifty percent of the movie.” – Hans Zimmer

13. “That’s the evergreen nature of a great song. They can be resurrected. They can be covered. They can find new relevance due to changing circumstances in history.” – John Legend

14. “There’s a very basic human, non-verbal aspect to our need to make music and use it as part of our human expression. It doesn’t have to do with body movements, it doesn’t have to do with articulation of a language, but with something spiritual.” – John Williams

15. “Music is the universal language of mankind.” – Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

16. “Music is what feelings sound like.” – Author Unknown

17. “Music produces a kind of pleasure which human nature cannot do without.” – Confucius

18. “A song will outlive all sermons in the memory.” – Henry Giles

19. “They should be covering their ears!” – Hans Zimmer

Man Made Music is proud to be part of television history. Our music served as the main theme, and underscore for big game moments, of Super Bowl XLIX, the most watched program in television history. Over 120 million tuned in and heard our music, which brought incredible energy to a stunning game, filled with lots of boom moments!

This year’s Super Bowl ads were all about brands using music and sound to pull on our heart strings and tell stories. Here are five of our favorites from this year’s spots.

T-Mobile

It’s the music that sets up the gag perfectly. Those piano notes tell us bad things are happening to our connection to Kim Kardashian and our data.

Nationwide

Mindy Kaling and Van Halen make for a powerful combination.

Dove

Nothing can tug the heart strings like the childrens’ voices in this Dove ad.

Geico

Taking a Musicless Musicvideo cue, Geico dials up humor by exaggerating foley. Nothing like the bling of a ring to amplify absurdity.

Coca-Cola

Hundred Waters “Show Me Love” for Coca-Cola is unbeatable.

Bonus: Man Made Music was a part of the Super Bowl yet again. Watch below to experience the power of sound again:

We’re bringing a new dimension to #TBT (Throwback Thursday) with #TBTPlaylists. This week, our music supervisor Kristy Zeigler put together a playlist that represents some of the big hits and events of 1977.

With the death of Elvis Presley, the growth of the punk rock scene and disco reaching the mainstream, 1977 was a pivotal turning point in popular music. Studio 54 opened its doors for the first time (a brief 10 minute walk from the Man Made Music office), cassette sales were on the rise, and the Eagles’ “Hotel California” was at the top of the charts.

When the top 50 albums of the year worldwide include the likes of Elvis, Peter Gabriel, Bob Marley, Steely Dan, The Sex Pistols, Fleetwood Mac, Supertramp, John Williams (for Star Wars), Barbara Streisand, and AC/DC, you know it was an interesting year in music history, to say the least. Enjoy the mix as we take you back to ’77…

It’s been a whirlwind of a week for the launch of The Sonic Boom: How Sound Transforms The Way We Think, Feel, and Buy! Here’s a recap of the best of the best – it’s not too late to share and be a part of the movement.


TIME: “Harvest Boon: 7 Great Fall Books” by Eliza Gray and Claire Howorth


NPR: “From Sizzling Fajitas To The Super Bowl, How Sounds Help Sell”


Inc: “How to Use Sound to Define Your Brand” by Jill Krasny


Advertising Age: “What Does Your Brand Sound Like?” by Max Willens


BuzzFeed: “How Much Do Brands Control Your Brain?” by Julia Furlan


Mashable: “33 Musical Earworms You Can’t Escape” by MJ Franklin


Fast Company: “What Does Your Brand Sound Like?” by KC Ifeanyi


WIRED: “How the Super Bowl and Sizzling Fajitas Manipulate You With Sound” by Nick Stockton

Be sure to follow Joel Beckerman on Twitter and Facebook for all the latest updates.

Welcome to our latest #TBTPlaylist. It’s great to listen to classic songs, but it puts a fresh spin on them to hear them from current artists. It’s also fun to hear them in different genres – putting a punk spin on an oldies song, putting an electronic spin on 80s song (not as extremebut you get my point.) This is a playlist that captures the fun party from summer, but also winds down a little as you ease back into work, school, etc or whatever it may be. Come to think of it, what classic song would you love to hear someone redo? Enjoy!


We’re bringing a new dimension to #TBT (Throwback Thursday) with #TBTPlaylists. This week, our music supervisor Kristy Zeigler put together a playlist that represents some of the big hits and events of 1977.

With the death of Elvis Presley, the growth of the punk rock scene and disco reaching the mainstream, 1977 was a pivotal turning point in popular music. Studio 54 opened its doors for the first time (a brief 10 minute walk from the Man Made Music office), cassette sales were on the rise, and the Eagles’ “Hotel California” was at the top of the charts.

When the top 50 albums of the year worldwide include the likes of Elvis, Peter Gabriel, Bob Marley, Steely Dan, The Sex Pistols, Fleetwood Mac, Supertramp, John Williams (for Star Wars), Barbara Streisand, and AC/DC, you know it was an interesting year in music history, to say the least. Enjoy the mix as we take you back to ’77…

 

Early this morning, YouTube sensation Dan Newbie appeared on The Weather Channel’s AMHQ to present his re-imagined version of the AMHQ theme song written by Man Made Music.

As you can see in the video, Dan uses instruments like wine glasses, jugs, a water bottle shaker and a 5-gallon water drum for the first 40 seconds before letting his music slide nicely into our original theme for the last 20 seconds. Nice work, Dan!

Follow Dan Newbie on Twitter: @DanNewbie
Follow Dan Newbie on YouTube: Dan Newbie
Follow Man Made Music on Twitter: @Man_Made_Music
Follow AMHQ on Twitter:
@AMHQ

“Can customers identify your brand with their eyes closed?”

It’s a question posed in the popular blog Marketing Profs about an area of brand identity that deserves a closer look – or listen, as the case may be.

The article rightly calls out Sonic Branding (or audio branding), as a part of a “multi-sensory approach,” which, “when used correctly, has the ability to deliver a distinct branding message – and make it stick once it gets there.”

Undoubtedly, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to make branding messages stick these days. An April 2013 study sponsored by the Coalition for Innovative Media Measurement found that 30 – 40% of TV ad viewing occurred concurrently with mobile device usage. Fahey makes the case that brands need a sonic identity just to compete with the digital distractions consumers are inundated with on a daily basis.

The author offers a general recommendation for brands considering a sonic identity: “I encourage you to think beyond licensed music to create distinctive audio signals and compositions. Use them to bring your customers home to the brand and what it represents.”

But the original question – “can customers identify your brand with their eyes closed” – deserves a follow up question, which is, “how does a brand go about achieving that goal?”

First, brands need to understand that there are sonic opportunities beyond the musical notes that appear when a company logo flashes across the screen (also known as a sonic logo). At Man Made Music, we have created original compositions, or brand anthems, and fostered the music licensing process to connect brands to their audiences. Both approaches have appropriate use cases. It’s not a “one size fits all” by any stretch of the imagination.

Second, and perhaps most important, before the creative work can begin, there needs to be strategy. The first step of the strategic engagement is to understand the brand’s audience and brand metrics for success. Instead of asking, “How do we want to sound to the rest of the world,” brands should first ask, “Who is our audience and what should they feel when interacting with us?”

Like visual identity elements, your sonic identity will evolve over time, but the core strategy concepts and brand equity – if done right – will be immutable.

Ultimately, it’s encouraging to see discussions Sonic Branding in the marketing space, and the need for a sonic identity based on current market conditions. But going from a brand without a sonic identity to one so powerful that consumers instantly recognize your brand with their eyes closed is no small feat – and that’s where we come in.